PhD Proposal Summary #cliffnotes #overview #nothappeninganytimesoon

Below is a summary of one of the many PhD proposals I submitted to various universities internationally. While I was able to get into more than 15 very competitive unis, I couldn’t secure even the slightest amount of funding from any of them. It’s been three years now and I don’t seem to be any closer to getting that funding. I have contemplated switching my topic and applying again, but I may have to hold off on it since my topic being accepted hasn’t been of issue, rather funding has been my main issue. However, enough time has passed that parts of my research are irrelevant and other parts are no longer original since it has been encompassed in other researcher’s findings. The more time that goes by, the less my specific lens in regards to the topic is original or new. And therein lies the dilemma.

Anyways, here is a snapshot of one of my proposals. My other proposals are variations of the same topic. As you may know, every university has different proposal requirements. Some want a 15 page proposal, some want a 5 page proposal. Others want a full literature review, while others look down on what they deem “name dropping.” Here is just one of the many variations of proposals I have saved.

Enjoy…

Project Overview

Research Title: Transnational Contemporary Palestinian Music: Transnational Palestinian Identity Formation, Palestinian Experience and its Role in Israeli Affairs

Palestinian contemporary music, particularly Palestinian hip-hop, which is very popular amongst Palestinian youth, acts as a medium for the Palestinian experience. Palestinian musicians voice their experiences and identity through their lyrics and this music acts as a medium to explore transnational Palestinian identity formation in the US and UK, seeing as this music is consumed globally by the Palestinian diaspora. [1] This research intends to study the role of Palestinian contemporary music in formulating a transnational Palestinian identity, how this transnational identity creates a new vision of Palestinian citizenship or activism and how this transnational identity and Palestinian citizenship influences Israel’s international relations.

Project Scope

The case study for this research is contemporary Palestinian music and its role in identity expression and formation, drawing a parallel between Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities concept that print capitalism brought the rise of the nationalism,[2] in turn globalisation’s role in transnational music distribution brought the rise of a transnational Palestinian identity. This research will assess in detail how this identity formed and what role this identity plays in their political activism concerning Israeli domestic and foreign relations. This will be achieved by researching the Palestinian community’s interactions with music and political opportunity structures in their home country’s, as well as Israel.

The members of DAM, a prominent Arab hip-hop group, come from Al-Lid, Israel, although they very strongly identify themselves as Palestinian in their lyrics. DAMs closing lyrics to their song, Stranger in My Country, illustrate their multi-layered identity. And our Arabian roots are still strong. But still our Arabian brothers are calling us renegades. No. We never sold our country. The occupation has written our destiny. Which is, that the whole world till today is treating us as Israelis. And Israel till tomorrow will treat us as Palestinians. I’m a stranger in my own country.” [3]

The lyrics of DAMs, Stranger in my Country, express feelings felt by Palestinian citizens of Israel. DAMs lyrics act as a form of communication to Palestinians living in other regions, serving as a form of news to these regions that otherwise may be unaware of what Palestinians in Israel experience. This leaves the Palestinian listeners with their own experiences that form their identity, in addition to the connection they have formed with other Palestinian experiences that influence their experience hereon in, and take part in shaping their identity. This hybrid identity then influences the state of Palestinian citizenship, affecting actions taken by Palestinians, political affiliations and civic duties, creating a transnational Palestinian citizenship.

Project Empirical and Methodological Overview

This project will assess why and how the Palestinian diaspora interacts with contemporary Palestinian music, embracing Palestinian identity or eschewing the community they live in as a form of political participation by using a postmodernist theory of methodology,[4] linking the use of music with political activism amongst Palestinians in the diaspora.[5] It will focus on organisational development of politically active groups on the macro, meso and micro levels, as well as diaspora Palestinian political inspirations found in Palestinian contemporary music. This project will garner empirical data through interviews with Palestinian music listeners and political activists, in order to build a comprehensive overview of how Palestinian lyrics and music can influence its listeners to form a transnational community that acts in benefit of a nation it does not live in. I also plan to translate and analyze Palestinian song lyrics and compare these lyrics to news reports that report socio-political circumstances of Palestinians. Attending conferences or concerts in which Palestinian musicians perform will give me better access to interview Palestinian contemporary music listeners. These interviews plan to get a better understanding of how Palestinians define their experiences, what constitutes a Palestinian identity, how connected they are to Palestinians in different regions, how they view Palestinian hip-hop and contemporary Palestinian music, as well as get a better idea of their political influences.

From the data collected, I will then seek to build a wider theoretical framework to analyse the Palestinian diaspora’s formulation of identity, how this identity is measured and the influence this identity has on Israeli foreign and domestic decision making. This research will build on the work of Usama Kahf, who researched Palestinian hip-hop and identity in Israel and its relation to the Palestinian political struggle;[6] Andy Bennett’s research that explored youth consumption of music and how this music is used to define the self;[7] Amal Jamal, who researched media’s use in cultural resistance, as well as Israeli media policies towards Palestinians;[8] and Bakari Kitwana’s research on rap music’s role in cultural movement and political power.[9]

A challenge arises as Palestinian hip-hop and other forms of contemporary Palestinian music is male dominatedHow does this dynamic play into identity formation amongst Palestinian women and does it have any impact on the political activism of Palestinian men or women?

Timeline

This research is expected to take up to three years as follows:

  • September 2015 January 2016Preliminary research, survey of literature and interpretive models.
  • February 2016 December 2016 Fieldwork, interviews and data collection.
  • January 2017 March 2017 Collate data and assess an interpretive model.
  • April 2017 September 2017 Development and presentation of preliminary findings and analysis.
  • October 2017 January 2018 First draft.
  • February 2018 October 2018 Final write up.

Project Aims and Objectives

This study will act as a vehicle case study for critiquing current research approaches to identity formation through music and its influence on international relations. It will be designed to challenge the paradigm that views transnational musical identity formation as insignificant in the face of international relations. This research is important because it fills existing empirical and theoretical gaps. Empirically, there is very little research on contemporary music’s role on the formulation of a transnational identity that leads to a politically active community that is capable of enacting change on an international level. There is also limited understanding of the Palestinian diaspora’s political aspirations and even less understanding of Israel’s interaction with Palestinian musical messages. This research looks to conduct thorough empirical research, particularly through interviews, observational data collection, quantitative monitoring of Palestinian music consumption amongst the diaspora. It will also involve an in depth analysis of contemporary Palestinian music’s lyrics, the messages intended in the music, as well as researching the connection between Israeli political relations and music.

Theoretically, this research will explore the limitations set forth by not incorporating an interdisciplinary approach to the subject of transnational musical identity’s influence on international relations and political activism. This research will utilise data to create an extended postmodernist framework to assess motivations for political activism in the diaspora and how much of that political activism is due to their Palestinian identity that was formed in part by Palestinian contemporary music.

Reasons for the Research

Recent social-political movements, such as the divestment campaigns led by Palestinian activists in the diaspora, and these movements links to transnational Palestinian identity, demonstrates the needs to understand the influence of transnational Palestinian music on this community. This research serves the purpose of better defining the Palestinian identity and what is means to be Palestinian,[10] as well as how contemporary Palestinian music has influenced this process. Once a better understanding of Palestinian identity is established, a better understanding of their experiences, their needs, desires, hopes and political aspirations as a collective can be recognised. As Palestinian youth become more influential in their societies, their shared transnational experiences and identity will shed insight onto the socio-political future of Palestinians and Israelis.    

Works Cited

1. P. Katzenstein, The Culture of National Security: Norms and Identity in World Politics, (Columbia University Press, 1996 ).

2. Bennett, Andy. Popular Music and Youth Culture: Music, Identity, and Place. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave, 2000. Print.

3. DAM. Stranger in My Own Country. 2007. MP3.

4. Keri E. Iyall Smith and Patricia Leavy (eds.), Hybrid Identities,  (Haymarket Books 2009), 267.

5. Jamal, Amaney and Nadine Naber, Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11: From Invisible Citizens to Visible Subjects , (Syracuse University Press, 2008).

6. Kahf, Usama. “Arabic Hip-Hop: Claims of Authenticity and Identity of a New Genre.”That’s the Joint!: The Hip-hop Studies Reader. By Murray Forman and Mark Anthony. Neal. New York: Routledge, 2012. N. pag. Print.

7. Bennett, Andy. Popular Music and Youth Culture: Music, Identity, and Place. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave, 2000. Print.

8. Jamal, Amal. The Arab Public Sphere in Israel: Media Space and Cultural Resistance. P. 23-24, Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2009. Print.

9. Kitwana, Bakari. That’s the Joint!: The Hip-hop Studies Reader. Ed. Mark Anthony. Neal and Murray Forman. New York: Routledge, 2012. N. pag. Print.

10. Darcy Zabel, Arabs in the Americas: Interdisciplinary Essays on the Arab Diaspora, (Peter Lang Publishing, 2006), 35-39.

The Key of Return

Carl Knappett examines the way in which people think through material culture stating that the “meaning of an object arises in the articulation of the its pragmatic and significant dimensions.” He uses a methodology that utilizes physical affordance, cultural and conventional constraints, iconicity, as well as indexicality, to exemplify Bonnot’s case study that showed that significance and symbolism of material culture could shift through time and spatiality.

This case study can be applied to that of Palestine, more specifically the right of return, Al ‘Awda, for Palestinian refugees. Within a Western context, old keys may be seen as just that, an old key. There are key museums that possibly seek to present older keys as art as opposed to anthropological artefact, as Gell would suggest. However, for Palestinian refugees, the symbolism of older keys not only represents, but also is synonymous with the right of return to their homeland, which they actively seek. Many Palestinians who fled Palestine during the Nakba held onto their house keys and land deeds, in hopes of a quick return. However, the current political situation has not lent itself to the repatriation of the Palestinian refugees, leading these keys to be passed down from generation to generation.

This generational hand-down of keys is one of the reasons why the image of the key is referred to as mftaH al ‘Awda, or the ‘Key of Return.’ This tradition has brought together generations of Palestinians in the aspiration to return to a homeland some have never seen. The Key of Return acts as a uniting factor amongst Palestinians all over the world, unifying Palestinians under one goal. Palestinians have shifted their political representation, as well as shifted their political aspirations, however, the right of return has been one thing that most Palestinians can agree on, regardless of political affiliation or geographic location.

While the Key of Return is largely a political statement, it can slink into the realm of the arts. Many Palestinian and Palestinian activists, who are artists, use this image in their work. The Key of Return has the ability to be both aesthetically appealing and meaningful, putting into issue Gell’s theory that people are “slaves” to art and aestheticism and that objects considered as “aesthetically superior” suggest symbolism beyond “mundane artefact.” The Key of Return’s beauty lay in the resistance movement, aspirations of return and Palestinian unity. It is only mundane when it is devoid of meaning and history, yet artists use the Key of Return as a socio-political statement in their art. Artists have the ability to evoke more emotion from an image of the key through various elements of their work; artwork of the key can therefore be considered meaningful and aesthetically appealing. However, had the Palestinian right of return not been associated with the image of the key, artists may fail to make the key aesthetically appealing, as it is a historical artefact, but it is the meaning behind the Key of Return that gives the key in artwork its aesthetic appeal.

The Key of Return

Carl Knappett examines the way in which people think through material culture stating that the “meaning of an object arises in the articulation of the its pragmatic and significant dimensions.” He uses a methodology that utilizes physical affordance, cultural and conventional constraints, iconicity, as well as indexicality, to exemplify Bonnot’s case study that showed that significance and symbolism of material culture could shift through time and spatiality.

This case study can be applied to that of Palestine, more specifically the right of return, Al ‘Awda, for Palestinian refugees. Within a Western context, old keys may be seen as just that, an old key. There are key museums that possibly seek to present older keys as art as opposed to anthropological artefact, as Gell would suggest. However, for Palestinian refugees, the symbolism of older keys not only represents, but also is synonymous with the right of return to their homeland, which they actively seek. Many Palestinians who fled Palestine during the Nakba held onto their house keys and land deeds, in hopes of a quick return. However, the current political situation has not lent itself to the repatriation of the Palestinian refugees, leading these keys to be passed down from generation to generation.

This generational hand-down of keys is one of the reasons why the image of the key is referred to as mftaH al ‘Awda, or the ‘Key of Return.’ This tradition has brought together generations of Palestinians in the aspiration to return to a homeland some have never seen. The Key of Return acts as a uniting factor amongst Palestinians all over the world, unifying Palestinians under one goal. Palestinians have shifted their political representation, as well as shifted their political aspirations, however, the right of return has been one thing that most Palestinians can agree on, regardless of political affiliation or geographic location.

While the Key of Return is largely a political statement, it can slink into the realm of the arts. Many Palestinian and Palestinian activists, who are artists, use this image in their work. The Key of Return has the ability to be both aesthetically appealing and meaningful, putting into issue Gell’s theory that people are “slaves” to art and aestheticism and that objects considered as “aesthetically superior” suggest symbolism beyond “mundane artefact.” The Key of Return’s beauty lay in the resistance movement, aspirations of return and Palestinian unity. It is only mundane when it is devoid of meaning and history, yet artists use the Key of Return as a socio-political statement in their art. Artists have the ability to evoke more emotion from an image of the key through various elements of their work; artwork of the key can therefore be considered meaningful and aesthetically appealing. However, had the Palestinian right of return not been associated with the image of the key, artists may fail to make the key aesthetically appealing, as it is a historical artefact, but it is the meaning behind the Key of Return that gives the key in artwork its aesthetic appeal.

The Ayurvedic Woman (view mobile) Naturally Minimize Menstrual & Menopausal Symptoms To Experience Wholesome, True, Symptom-free Health

Click Here!

 

“…Mary is not just a teacher with 19 years of experience but it’s really the quality of her teaching that’s the most important. Mary is well known for being concise, clear and inspirational…”

“Mary Thompson has been a faculty member at California College of Ayurveda and teaching for 19 years. There are very few people in the USA that have the level of teaching experience that Mary Thompson has and Mary is not just a teacher with 19 years of experience but it’s really the quality of her teaching that’s the most important. Mary is well known for being concise, clear and inspirational.

Here at California College of Ayurveda, all the students love Mary, she’s a wonderful teacher, she cares deeply about the material she is teaching, she is impassioned about it and most important thing is that she is living the principles of Ayurveda that helped her tremendously in her life.

I’m very pleased that you have the opportunity to share how it has helped Mary and also how it’ll help you, so many blessing to all of you as you go on your journey with Mary Thompson.”

Dr. Marc Halpern
D.C.,C.A.S.,P.K.S.

President and Founder of the California College of Ayurveda, Co-founder of the California Association of Ayurvedic Medicine and the National Council on Ayurvedic Education, Former Chairman of the National Committee on Ayurvedic Education for the National Ayurvedic Medical Association

…Mary has a way of explaining things that’s down to earth, that’s grounded, shes a real person, she’s a real westerner and she gets this stuff deep inside out and she’s raised a child. That’s who you want to learn Ayurveda from…

“I’m here to give my full endorsement of Marys Thompson. She was my first teacher at the California College of Ayurveda and I spent my whole first year studying Ayurveda with Mary Thompson and I just have to say for many of us this is the path, Ayurveda learning for us is the path for us to open up into the next level of our life and our teachers matter, so to have Mary as your teacher on this path is an honor.

Mary has a way of explaining things that’s down to earth, that’s grounded, shes a real person, she’s a real westerner and she gets this stuff deep inside out and she’s raised a child. That’s who you want to learn Ayurveda from, someone who can live it.”

Cate Stillman-

Entrepreneur, Ayurvedic Practitioner, Certified Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist. Pancha Karma Specialist and Yoga Teacher, Author and Founder of Yogahealer.com, co-host of the Ayurveda Summit

“…Anyone who gets to study with her is genuinely lucky and I would always be grateful to her for every bit of time I’ve gotten with her as her student…”

“I know Mary from studying at the CCA and also from private tutoring with her after my graduation. I could never say enough about Mary’s teaching- she is genuinely my greatest Ayurvedic teacher. She brings so much knowledge to the table and the most powerful thing about her teaching is the ability to really take all these big ideas all these obtuse, theories and ideas and really bring them to the ground and make then understandable and digestible.

And she really brings so much accessibility to this knowledge for people in the now, for people in 2015. She makes it really possible and really easy to blend this ancient knowledge with our modern lives.

There are so many parts of Mary’s teaching that are potent that it’s hard to pick out just a few but another one of many, many of her strengths is her ability to answer questions from so many different angles. She’s never once failed on a question of mine and I had plenty and she would find answers for me. If I wouldn’t understand one way she would try to find another way. She was really committed to my learning and committed to making this knowledge really mine

I would take anything that Mary teaches at any point, I would take things more than once, there’s just truly no greater teacher you can ask for.

Anyone who gets to study with her is genuinely lucky and I would always be grateful to her for every bit of time I’ve gotten with her as her student.”

Carly Beaudin
Clinical Ayurvedic Practitioner

WHY MUST EVERY WOMAN,

Watch and Share this Program with other Women?

First and foremost, this education should begin right at the age of transition of a girl to a woman- it is THAT important and fundamental. However, in today’s stressful times, it is all the more important for women of all age groups at any stage of life to learn this about their own bodies, to understand and love themselves better.

When we’re young, hail and hearty on relationships issues, maintaining a slim waistline, saving enough for that dream holiday or competing with people at work and at that age, we have no conversations about what is going to happen to you in a few years, nobody talks about the reality that might take a dark shape for you if you do not act ‘now’. As a woman, education for a deeper understanding of the menstrual cycle and the inevitable menopause, is very important.

Not only it is important for you to know about the phenomenon affecting your body today, it is also imp to know before menopause comes and take adequate steps in good time. And if, you find that symptoms are already interfering in your life, it is all the more helpful for you to turn over the Ayurvedic Leaf and experience relief naturally

A lot of relief can be felt not by pills or artificial medication, but by making diet and lifestyle changes, and not just any changes, but the changes right for you, depending on your Doshic composition

You must take responsibility for yourself, especially when Ayurveda makes it so easy for you- external elements such as pills can only do as much, sometimes not even that. can only do as much, sometimes not even that. An educated approach will give you greater control to prevent and manage symptoms.

Even for men, they must know and understand how doshas affect reproductive cycles as well as how they affect women in particular as this would help deepening relationships and make it easier for you and partner to sail through tough times.

What does this course contain?

PART-1

Introduction To Ayurveda

  • What is Ayurveda?
  • Ayurvedic View of Health & Disease
  • The Trifold Cause of disease
  • The Three Pillars of Health
  • Understanding your Dosha: How you are NOT Vata, Pitta or Kapha!
  • Vata: the Principle of Movement
  • Pitta: the Principle of Transformation
  • Kapha: the Principle of Stability
  • The Doshas and The Causes of Disease
  • The Seven Dhatu: Tissues of the body/sites of disease
    -How they affect your reproductive health and how you can take care of them

PART-2

Applying Ayurvedic principles to female reproductive health
Child Bearing Years~
Menstrual cycle & Fertility

  • 6 Signs of Health in Female Reproductive System
  • Understanding Ayurveda’s view of menses and fertility: DHATU
  • How does Vata,pitta and kapha affect reproductive health?
  • Balanced menstruation and Symptoms of imbalance
  • Factors affecting reproductive health:
    • – Endometrial Lining (RASA Quality of the RASA Dhatu)
    • – The egg (SHUKRA Quality of Shukra Dhatu)
    • – Fats of the Omentum (MEDA Quality of Meda Dhatu)
    • – Hormones
    • – STRESS
  • What you need to know about the endocrine system
  • What are the causes of hormonal imbalance?
  • What can any woman do to better manage her hormone levels?
  • Menstruation- A plan to maintain balance all month long:
    • – PACIFYING VATA
    • – PACIFYING PITTA
    • – PACIFYING KAPHA
  • How to deal with Menstrual symptoms
  • Easing PMS
  • Easing Cramping

PART-3

A natural change of life
THE AYURVEDIC UNDERSTANDING
OF MENOPAUSAL SYMPTOMS

  • What, exactly, is menopause?
  • What causes menopausal symptoms?
  • Ayurvedic Interpretation of Menopause and Menopausal Symptoms
  • “Resting on our Estrogen”
  • What is peri-menopause?
  • Symptoms of Menopause
  • Menopausal Symptoms: What they indicate and how to address them:
    • -Hot Flashes
    • -Rasa Tea: An Easy tip for Building Rasa Dhatu
    • -Dry Skin & Vaginal Mucosa
    • -Vascular changes
    • -Liver Support
    • -Loss of Tone: Skin & Muscle
    • -Weight Gain
    • – Thinning Hair and Loss of Bone Density
    • – Menopausal symptoms: What they indicate and how to address them:
    • – Anxiety, Headaches, Irregular heartbeat
    • – A plan to regain balance without estrogen
    • – Dinacharya: Daily Routines for Women’s Health
    • – Summary

http://c2f37gq1i05s0t08bpzgwgme19.hop.clickbank.net/?tid=AYURWOMAN

Me- ALL DAY! #ootd #fashionpost

ootd161.jpgRight On Pant $88.00 Style: 36137545, Revolve HELLER SCOOP NECK THUMBHOLE TEE MICHAEL LAUREN $96.00, Submit $3.59 Mixit™ Womens Plush Slipper Socks

Must Have #Spring #Accessories #fashionpost #shopspring

Hello Pistachios!

Springtime is just around the corner and if you’re anything like me, you’re super excited for the nice weather, bright colors and pretty clothes. Already the weather is starting to get warmer and brighter. I’ve started pulling out the springtime dresses and getting my spring cleaning done- AND IT FEELS GREAT! I don’t know about you, but spring cleaning is a great excuse to purge my closet of clothes and accessories I haven’t worn in a while. [Don’t forget to donate your lightly worn clothes to charity.] So as my closet starts to look bare, I have to ask: What am I going to replace it all with?

In lieu of my daily fashion post, here is a list of my must have Spring accessories from my new favorite shop. Spring was inspired by some fashion boutiques in SoHo, New York City. It’s a great site because it gives you the experience of shopping at all these boutiques in one place. Plus there are some really cute accessories on there that I totally want… like, now!

As you can tell from my list, I’m all about the sunglasses, watches and headbands. I want it all!

😛

Happy Shopping!

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Magnolia Cat Eye Sunglasses

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Get involved with Israeli Apartheid Week

mail@bdsnationalcommittee.org

Want to support Palestinian freedom, justice and equality?

Join #IsraeliApartheidWeek 2016

Each year, Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW) takes place in more than 150 universities and cities across the world. With creative education and action, IAW aims to raise awareness about Israel’s regime of occupation, settler-colonialism and apartheid over the Palestinian people and build support for the nonviolent Palestinian-led Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement.

In response to the impressive growth of BDS in the last few years, Israel and its right-wing allies in the west have launched repressive, anti-democratic attacks on the movement and the right to boycott, instead of fulfilling their obligations to end Israel’s violations of international law. This makes this year’s #IsraeliApartheidWeek more crucial than ever.

Support Palestinian popular resistance to oppression–join IAW 2016.

Check out apartheidweek.org and #IsraeliApartheidWeek to find out what’s happening in your area. More events in different cities are being added all the time, so do check back if there’s nothing in your city listed yet. 

Want to organise #IsraeliApartheidWeek events on your campus or in your city? Register your organisation here and you’ll receive an info pack full of ideas about how to organise #IsraeliApartheidWeek.

Dates:
UK: February 22-28
Europe: February 29-March 7
Palestine: March 1-10
South Africa: March 7-13
Arab World: March 20-26
US: various, including March 27-April 3
Latin America: April 10-24
Canada: various throughout March, check with local organisers

The Jews of Iraq, Zionist Ideology, and the Property of the Palestinian Refugees of 1948: An Anomaly of National Accounting

For a presentation on Yehouda Shenhav’s article go here

 

http://prezi.com/c70dvfvapoqv/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

Post-Zionist Critique on Israel and the Palestinians: Part 1 The Academic Debate

A presentation of Ilan Pappe’s 1997 article can be found here

http://prezi.com/fi9mqt6uxuy7/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

President Obama rejects Keystone XL pipeline

 

 

 

This morning, President Obama announced that he is officially rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline proposal.

Click here to share the victory image below with your friends on Facebook to celebrate the good news:

This is an historic moment. I’m actually in shock. Hundreds of thousands of us have been fighting against this pipeline for years. We’ve argued with family members, signed letters to our representatives, joined protests, and been arrested. And it worked.

Victory doesn’t happen every time we raise our voices. But more often than not, it only happens if we do. When the Keystone pipeline was introduced seven years ago, many people thought it was inevitable that the pipeline would be approved even though experts revealed it would be an environmental disaster and create only about 35 permanent jobs.

We could have kept quiet, shaking our heads and saying “Well, what can you do?”

But we didn’t. We refused to let this go. We were tenacious, we worked together, we flooded the streets. We collected more than 606,000 signatures on Care2 petitions against the pipeline. The Tar Sands Action sit-in at the White House was the largest civil disobedience action in the United States since 1977.

And we aren’t done. There are still huge fights ahead. We need to stop the expansion of offshore drilling, to take bold action at the Paris climate talks next month, and above all we need accountability from our decision-makers.

But we can do it. We are a massive movement of people across the country and around the world, and we will defend our environment. We will not be ignored.

President Obama just confirmed it. Let’s celebrate it.

Click here to share the victory image on Facebook. People are inspired by the stories their friends tell, so don’t be shy: consider adding a personal note to your post about how you contributed to the fight against Keystone, what you’re hoping for next, or what your reaction is to this huge moment.

Thank you for everything you’ve done and will do to keep this movement strong,

 

Jen

The Care2 Petitions Team