Caturday #ootd #fashionpost #style

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White Rose #ootd #fashionpost

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New Sherlock Holmes Mysteries By Craig Stephen Copland

New Sherlock Holmes Stories For Mystery Lovers! Sherlock Holmes Is The World’s Most Famous And Loved Detective. Millions Of Fans Are Waiting For More Stories. Sixty New Novellas Are On Their Way – Each One A Product That Will Appeal To Readers Everywhere. Click Here!

CraigSCopland

Craig Stephen Copland is a native of Toronto, Canada and now divides his time between Canada, where his children and grandchildren live, and Manhattan/Washington DC, where he still pretends to be writing  and consulting.  Way back in the late 1960s and early 1970s he was an English major at the University of Toronto and had the good fortune to study under both Northrup Frye and Marshall McLuhan. At sometime in the decades since he became a Sherlockian and developed a minor addiction to the sacred canon of Arthur Conan Doyle stories about the great detective.

He is a recent member of the Sherlock Holmes Society of Canada, who have met faithfully for many years under the name of The Bootmakers and recommends this excellent group of fine chaps and fascinating ladies to all those who share a devotion to Mr. Holmes.

In real life, when he has time for it, he writes about and serves as a consultant for political campaigns in Canada and the USA but would likely abandon that vocation if he thought for a moment he could make a living writing about Sherlock Holmes.

 

http://e8d33axu3r9neo9rm6x5z2xygy.hop.clickbank.net/?tid=SHERLOCKHOLMES

Restoration of ancient sites and celebrating Christmas in Bethlehem Volunteer Opportunity posted by: CADIP

Volunteer Opportunity description

The project seeks to bring people of various cultures together to build bridges of understanding, reconciliation, and peace. The long term goal of the project is to prepare youth to make positive contributions to their future and society through the values of understanding, helping, contributing tolerance, and respectful coexistence. These goals are achieved through education, awareness, youth empowerment and international volunteer projects.

Restoration of ancient sites in Bethlehem

The volunteers will work in different areas in Bethlehem city. The work includes renovation of old sites near the Church of the Nativity and assisting the Bethlehem municipality in preparing for the Christmas season. The activities involve painting the streets, distribution of booklets and flyers to tourists, decorating walls, etc.

Restoration of ancient sites in Bethlehem

The volunteer project will be running at Christmas time, and Bethlehem is the best place to celebrate Christmas in.

More info: http://www.cadip.org/volunteer-in-palestine

Celebrating Christmas in Bethlehem

Volunteering at Christmas

Share the spirit of Christmas and spread some holiday cheer while lending a helping hand on one of our charitable projects around the globe.

www.cadip.org

How to apply

Enrollment and other similar volunteer projects: http://www.cadip.org

Give us a call:

USA: 310-882-7400; 646-657-2900; 617-841-0400;

Canada: 604-628-7400; 416-943-4900; 514-316-8500

Restoration and preservation of the cultural landscape of Hebron and Bethlehem

http://www.idealist.org/view/volop/34z62N5TN2gW4

Restoration and preservation of the cultural landscape of Hebron and Bethlehem

Volunteer Opportunity posted by: CADIP

Posted on: February 26, 2016

Volunteer Opportunity description

This volunteer project will be carried out in two cities – Hebron and Bethlehem. In Hebron, volunteers will work in the Old City and in a local Children’s center, while in Bethlehem, the group will work in the village of Battir and in other parts of the city.

Volunteer Abroad (www.cadip.org)

The project seeks to protect and renovate old Palestinian sites, and in particular, Battir – an ancient village with wonderful landscape and nature, just outside the town of Bethlehem, which has been inhabited since the Iron Age. Battir has a unique irrigation system that utilizes man-made terraces and a system of manually diverting water via sluice gates. The old monuments and water canals of Battir date back to thousands of years, and the landscape resembles the one of the Babylon gardens. The place has been registered by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 2014.

Volunteer Abroad (www.cadip.org)

The work will include the following activities:
– Planting trees in different places in Hebron, visiting villages around Hebron city and helping them rehabilitate their lands
– Fun activities with children attending summer camps
– Tours around the old cities of Hebron and Bethlehem: painting, cleaning, and renovating old places
– Rehabilitation of old places in Battir, including the very ancient water canals. This special ancient water system is connected to several natural water sources.
– Help rebuilding an ancient wall that leads to the very ancient water cistern at the edge of the village. This wall will help locals and visitors reach the water cistern, which is hoped to become a historical and natural tourist attraction.
– Working on several locations beside the ancient train railway, which at the time of the Ottoman Empire was the main line that connected Turkey to Palestine. The location of the railway is the borderline between Palestine and Israel.

Volunteer Abroad (www.cadip.org)

The project will include intensive cultural events that aim at raising the awareness of the volunteers on the history of Palestine and the conflict, in addition to meetings with civil society representatives in both cities that work in social development.

Project dates: July 23 – August 2, 2016

More info: http://www.cadip.org/volunteer-in-palestine

Volunteer Abroad (www.cadip.org)

How to apply

Enrollment and other similar volunteer projects: http://www.cadip.org

Give us a call:

USA: 310-882-7400; 646-657-2900; 617-841-0400;

Canada: 604-628-7400; 416-943-4900; 514-316-8500

Get involved with Israeli Apartheid Week

mail@bdsnationalcommittee.org

Want to support Palestinian freedom, justice and equality?

Join #IsraeliApartheidWeek 2016

Each year, Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW) takes place in more than 150 universities and cities across the world. With creative education and action, IAW aims to raise awareness about Israel’s regime of occupation, settler-colonialism and apartheid over the Palestinian people and build support for the nonviolent Palestinian-led Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement.

In response to the impressive growth of BDS in the last few years, Israel and its right-wing allies in the west have launched repressive, anti-democratic attacks on the movement and the right to boycott, instead of fulfilling their obligations to end Israel’s violations of international law. This makes this year’s #IsraeliApartheidWeek more crucial than ever.

Support Palestinian popular resistance to oppression–join IAW 2016.

Check out apartheidweek.org and #IsraeliApartheidWeek to find out what’s happening in your area. More events in different cities are being added all the time, so do check back if there’s nothing in your city listed yet. 

Want to organise #IsraeliApartheidWeek events on your campus or in your city? Register your organisation here and you’ll receive an info pack full of ideas about how to organise #IsraeliApartheidWeek.

Dates:
UK: February 22-28
Europe: February 29-March 7
Palestine: March 1-10
South Africa: March 7-13
Arab World: March 20-26
US: various, including March 27-April 3
Latin America: April 10-24
Canada: various throughout March, check with local organisers

TRANSCRIPT: Foreign Press Center Briefing with Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and Senior Official for APEC Matt Matthews

FOREIGN PRESS CENTER BRIEFING WITH DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE AND SENIOR OFFICIAL FOR APEC MATT MATTHEWS

TOPIC:  PREVIEW OF APEC 2015

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2015, 10:30 A.M. EDT

THE WASHINGTON FOREIGN PRESS CENTER, WASHINGTON, D.C.

MR ZIMMER:  Good morning.  Welcome to the Foreign Press Center.  My name is Mark Zimmer.  I’m one of the Media Relations Officers here.  We’re very pleased to welcome you this morning to a pre-brief of the APEC 2015 meeting with Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Matt Matthews. 

Before we start, I’d like to take a moment to mention International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists.  That’s today, November 2nd.  I don’t have to tell this group about the importance of a free press as part of every vibrant democracy regardless of location or culture.  This commemoration, which the UN General Assembly initiated in 2013, reminds all of us of our responsibility to prevent violence against members of the media and to ensure accountability for those who do commit violence.  The United States Government commends all of you for your role in promoting free speech, and we recognize the importance of journalists being able to do their work without fear.

With that, let me please welcome Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Matt Matthews.  He will have some opening remarks, and then we’ll take questions.  I will moderate that session.  We’ll welcome colleagues in New York as appropriate.  Thank you.

MR MATTHEWS:  Good morning.  I’m very happy to be here with you all to just preview a few items in the lead-up to our APEC senior officials meeting, the APEC ministerial, and of course, the APEC leaders meeting, which will conclude our APEC year. 

I think as all of you know, APEC is a critical piece of our economic architecture in the Asia Pacific region, and we see it as the premier organization for advancing free and open trade and investment.  It’s also used to foster cooperation in promoting sustainable and equitable growth.  One of the most important parts of our Rebalance agenda is for shared prosperity in the region, and APEC contributes directly to that agenda.  There are a number of things that go into it, but APEC basically is structured to help regional integration, stability, and to support rules conducive to U.S. economic competitiveness both for us and the region as a whole.

There are a couple of reasons why APEC really does work and works effectively.  Number one, it’s the institution in the region that we use where we can cooperate on freer and more open trade and investment.  It’s the right environment for holding those discussions.  We have the right experts together both from government and from business to create substantial and workable, practical measures that help move us forward in that area. 

It’s also a good institution for capacity building.  The United States participates in that, but so do other economies in APEC.  And the purpose of that capacity building is to make sure our participatory economies in APEC or developing countries have the capabilities that enable them to take advantage of the trade liberalization that we move forward on in APEC.

And, lastly, I’d say that it’s key to ensuring economic growth that is sustainable and that benefits everyone.  That’s a key element in the themes that you’ll hear time and again during the Philippines’ year, is inclusive growth.  It’s really something that APEC has been working on for some time, but it is being highlighted during the Philippine host year. 

So, we see APEC being able to move forward on all these fronts because it’s an incubator for new ideas, for innovative approaches, and for tackling challenges in the region that other folks haven’t thought of or tried before.  That’s facilitated, as I said, by the level of frank and open discussion that we can have in APEC.  And we can have that kind of frank and open discussion because it’s an organization that’s based on consensus, and the outcomes that we reach are non-binding except inasmuch as each and every member economy commits to doing the things that we all have agreed make sense to do, that we all agree will expand trade, will create greater prosperity, and create benefits across our economies.

So what you’ll see over time is each and every economy coming to a conclusion, coming to a consensus within APEC, and then going home and doing the things they need to do to make those proposals fact, to make them real, to actually open their economies in ways that actually have spurred growth in the region.

I believe that APEC not only has but will continue to play essential role in enabling agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership and those of the WTO by helping economies envision and prepare for high-standard rules-based economic systems throughout the region.  I think one perfect example of how APEC has done that is in the area of environmental goods and services. 

So I just thought I’d highlight it for you because this year is the year in which all economies have committed to implementing commitments to either reduce tariffs on 54 items in the environmental goods and services list to below 5 percent or zeroing them out completely.  That’s an amazing step forward, and it’s a step that inspired the WTO to try to pick up a similar process.  And it’s moving forward now on a global framework.

So, again, incubator of ideas, effective means of communication within APEC where we have open discussions and plenty of time to examine the consequences of what a policy move might mean, then consensus and moving forward on it to implementation and providing that idea for others in the global economic community as a point of reference and, perhaps, adoption as in the case of environmental goods and services.

So that environmental goods and services list and the implementation of it is one of the real key highlights for deliverables this year.  But there is much more on the APEC agenda, and first and foremost I would say is work on digital economy.  This is something we’ve been working on for the past couple of years and we’re continuing to prepare it to ensure that the internet and the dissemination of new technologies that have led to rapid change is, in fact, possible within the APEC environment. 

What does this really mean for us?  It means that the internet needs to be open for markets and for free flow of information.  The free flow of information is critical to firms making rapid and accurate decisions.  So anything that prevents the free flow of information on the internet really is an impediment to growth.  It’s an impediment to prosperity. 

So we’re supporting a discussion in APEC that looks to identify those barriers and, as we move forward not only just this year but in the years to come, to thinking about ways we can move forward of dealing with the digital economy as a major trade issue for APEC, one that will allow us to address barriers in an effective way across the board.

The goal here, of course, is to make sure that we have a 21st economy in the Asia Pacific that continues to drive growth for the globe, and we’ll do that by making sure that we’re on that cutting edge, that we’re taking advantage of all the tools and all the benefits that the internet has that we can apply to our economic systems.

Another thing, of course, moving forward is work on the free trade area of the Pacific.  There is a study going on now and … working chapters are being developed by various economies.  That is something that will be progressing year by year as we look at ways of even broadening out the degree of integration within APEC.

There’s also, as I said, a key agenda on prosper – maintaining prosperity through sustainable, healthy, and resilient communities.  So what are we talking about there?  In APEC, we’ve come up with practical applications for dealing with marine debris.  There are better programs going out now where cities are undertaking very pragmatic programs that will take debris, waste material, and turn it into energy – just a creative and effective and economically viable approach.  Again, we’re doing it as an example, not only to the Asia Pacific region, but for the globe as well.

Fossil fuel subsidy reviews – we’re taking a look in APEC at those fossil fuel subsidies and asking each economy to take a clear look and ask themselves whether it’s delivering economic benefit or is it perhaps counterproductive.  And in those cases where they identify a counterproductive subsidy – that means a subsidy that doesn’t work to that – the goal that we have in mind or that – or there are other policy options that might be more efficient.  Folks are then encouraged to pursue those other options. 

On the environment, we’ve got a number of initiatives but, of course, first and foremost was the environmental goods and services agreement.  And I’d just highlight for you, in terms of environment, that the reason why that’s important is we are encouraging businesses and encouraging economies to adopt the best available technologies that allow us to grow, but to grow greener by reducing our carbon footprint.  One key way to do that is by zeroing out the tariff, cutting the tax on those items so that businesses are more likely to adopt those technologies sooner and on a broader scale.  That means that we can grow and reduce our carbon footprint at the same time.  But in addition to that, we’re also doing work on electric vehicles and, as I said, we’re doing this fossil fuel subsidy study.  So there’s that element on environment.

Again, there’s an element covering health.  And in health, we’ve done work on both reducing the barriers – or not reducing but at last identifying barriers to trade in health care products.  Again, looking forward, what we’ve got in mind here is this:  What we’re trying to do is improve the health outcomes in each and every economy, and one of the best ways of doing that is to take a look and see where are the tariff rates inconsistent with that goal?  Where are they so high that they’re actually preventing good health care products from getting to consumers who need them?  And, ultimately, what we’ll try to do is work together with our other APEC economies and come up with approaches of how we can reduce those barriers.

But another thing that we’re doing is working in public-private partnerships on infection prevention and the control that is working in conjunction with the global health security agenda.  

And a third area of work in APEC, which is very important and which requires private sector assistance – and one reason why APEC is so effective is it brings the private sector together with government – is to take a look at innovative medical products and take a look at the kind of global standards we’re adopting in applying them.

I’ll give you a following-up area for work that we’re doing, is in women’s economic empowerment.  Here, the most basic thing we’re trying to achieve is ensuring that each and every economy in APEC grows at its optimum level, but the only way you can really do that is by ensuring that women have a full right to participate in the workforce and to contribute to our economic growth. 

So in a broad range of measures, both on – by identifying policy frameworks that can facilitate and encourage full participation of women in the economy through a digital dashboard, and through a number of other specific measures, including this year we had one on transportation – women and transportation, which took a very clear look at this key node, making sure that women have safe transportation systems to get them to and from work, to make sure that that doesn’t become a barrier to their participation in the workforce.  And as a kind of ripple effect, allow economies to say, okay, that’s the way it worked in transportation; are there other areas in our economy that are, unbeknownst to us or without us having really thought through them, creating barriers that we didn’t intend but are in fact there?  As we take a look at the policy settings, we can say here are things, practical things, we can do to make sure that there’s nothing that stands between a woman and her desire to participate in that economy and generate income for her family and help that economy grow.

So one last thing I would mention to you is our work on disaster preparedness.  This is something that was particularly poignant, I think, for the Philippines here because the Philippines, of course, is subject to as many if not more disasters than any other economy in APEC, whether it’s volcanoes, whether it’s earthquakes, whether it’s typhoons.  But all economies in APEC to some degree or other have to handle these kinds of challenges.  And what we want to do, particularly in APEC, is make sure that we’re coordinating in ways that, number one, ensure that we can get humanitarian goods to and from any disaster zone as efficiently and effectively as possible.  This means over time dealing with the customs regulations and restrictions that might slow down that process.  Our goal here is to make sure we alleviate suffering as much as we possibly can, as soon as we possibly can.  And a second element of the APEC’s work on disaster preparedness is, again, I think unique to APEC because it takes a look at what happens after you’ve dealt with the immediate humanitarian crisis:  What about getting our supply chains back in business?  What about getting our businesses back up and running?  What about making sure we have resilient energy systems that can be either sustained through a disaster scenario or be returned to service as quickly as possible?  We’re looking at all those kinds of elements within the framework of discussions in APEC.  So I think you can see we have a really broad agenda, but it’s focused on delivering economic improvement and greater prosperity and greater equity throughout the system.

So I think with those opening remarks, I’ll just open it up.

MR ZIMMER:  Thank you.  Please identify yourself and your outlet.  If any guests in New York come to the microphone, we’ll recognize them.

Please, in the middle here.

QUESTION:  Thank you.  Welcome to the Foreign Press Center.  I have a question about India.  India has applied for membership of APEC and Philippines said it’s considering it.  What’s U.S. position on that?

MR MATTHEWS:  I don’t believe that there’s any active consideration within APEC for expanded membership at the current time.  From time to time, countries and economies will register interest and – at present, though, there’s been no significant discussion along those lines.  But at a future date, those things may be reviewed and we will see where they go.

One thing I would suggest is for any economy that’s interested in APEC, a great way to start is to go into – identify sub-fora or working groups that work on particular areas across our APEC agenda that are of particular interest to them and apply as a guest to send experts in to participate, both to help understand how APEC works and to get a better understanding of how we process and turn out good outcomes that help APEC be that organization that pushes for leading-edge and innovative ways of expanding a more open and free trade and investment environment.

MR ZIMMER:  In the middle here, please.

QUESTION:  Hi, I’m Alexander Panetta from the Canadian Press.  So there will be a new member of APEC this year – Canada has a new prime minister in two days.  So I’m just wondering whether there are any plans for either a bilateral or a pull-aside with Canada’s new Prime Minister Trudeau and any issues that might be priorities for the United States in dealing with a new government.

MR MATTHEWS:  Well, Canada has a new prime minister and we welcome the prime minister into the APEC family, but Canada is not a new member.  And Canada is a very significant and important member of APEC, one which we work with very closely.  We anticipate having a tremendous amount of continuity in the APEC agenda and that Canada, if it does have new priorities that it would like to raise or address, I’m sure we’ll be hearing from the prime minister and his team when we go into the ministerial and leaders agenda period during these discussions coming up.  But nothing’s been raised as of yet that I’m aware of.

MR ZIMMER:  Thanks very much.  Let’s go to the side here, please.

QUESTION:  My name is Varughese George.  I have a follow-up question on India.  I’m from India, The Hindu newspaper.  India has already been an observer since 2011 and President Obama, when he visited India last year, did say that the U.S. would support India’s membership in APEC.  So are you suggesting that there is no forward movement at all on that – India’s request for membership?

MR MATTHEWS:  I think it’s just important to be very careful and accurate about describing the President’s comments.  The President has welcomed India’s interest in APEC, and I think that speaks for itself.  We are welcoming your interest.  We welcome India’s examination of what APEC’s all about, but we have not entered into a discussion and I don’t believe India is formally pressing for actual membership now in APEC.  And remember, keep this in mind, APEC is an organization that’s consensus-based.  So each and every member of APEC has to agree to an expansion of APEC membership, and no discussions in APEC this year have focused on that topic – just so you’re focused on that, okay?  You’re welcome.

MR ZIMMER:  We’ll do the front and then we’ll go to the back, please.

QUESTION:  Thank you, Matt.  Rita Cheng from Central News Agency, Taiwan.  Every year the U.S. delegation will meet with the Taiwan’s counterpart during the APEC.  I wondered is there any meeting confirmed during this year?  And any other topic that you will be discuss with Taiwan’s counterpart? 

And also, not every country in – of APEC has been included in TPP.  I wonder the America – how America and in what way will put the – cooperate the TPP (inaudible) with the – like the region’s economic framework?  Thank you.

MR MATTHEWS:  Okay, I’m not sure if I got all of that.  But first and foremost, Taipei is a full member in APEC – Chinese Taipei is a full member in APEC, and it works across the whole APEC agenda with every other economy in APEC and we work with Chinese Taipei in those various sub-fora and working groups, in senior official meetings that I participate in with, and of course during ministerials and even the leaders meeting.  So I think you can anticipate that, just as in prior years, Chinese Taipei will be an active participant in all those elements and we look forward to that.

MR ZIMMER:  In the back, please.

QUESTION:  Good morning.  My name is Adam Xu from Voice of America, Mandarin service.  I have two questions.  You mentioned the U.S. will support the discussion on the free flow of information on the internet.  I’m wondering:  Do you have a list of participants in the (inaudible) or is this discussion going to be carried out?  And can you elaborate on the focus of such discussion, and what are your expectations?

And my second question is about the South China Sea.  Given the recent tensions in South China Sea, is it going to be on the agenda in the APEC discussions?

MR. MATTHEWS:  Thank you.  So, on digital economy, right now we’re at an early stage in the APEC process on discussing the digital economy and digital trade issues, so I would say that this is essentially a working-level process.  But both at ministerial and, I believe hopefully, at the leaders level there will be acknowledgement that this is an important issue that has to be discussed and engaged in, but it primarily has to be engaged at this working level to make sure we kind of start to flesh out all the different specifics that we think are critical to ensuring that we have a free and open internet that supports future economic growth.  So I guess that’s where I’d say we’re on that one.

And I have nothing for you on the South China Sea, except I would just reiterate that APEC is an organization that focuses on economic issues. 

MR ZIMMER:  How about on the side for this one.

QUESTION:  Hi, 21st Century Business Herald.  About TPP, some trade experts told me that among the TPP members in the ASEAN countries, Malaysia will be the one, the country that will face a lot of challenge during the TPP ratification process in terms of the prime minister’s challenge from his own party and from parliament.  So is this the case, or do you optimistic about the ratification process of TPP in Malaysia as there will be a trade minister session in the APEC?  Thanks.

MR MATTHEWS:  Well, I am optimistic about ratification of the TPP agreement by all the participating economies.  It doesn’t mean that it won’t take a lot of work.  Even in our own country we anticipate it’s going to be a major effort to make sure we do a good job of explaining the actual outcomes of TPP and what the benefits are.  But we remain optimistic and I think we remain optimistic across all the participating economies. 

MR ZIMMER:  In the middle, please, then we’ll go to the back.

QUESTION:  Hi, Maria Garcia, Notimex, the Mexican news agency.  As – Mexico as a member of APEC has started ambitious economic reforms.  Do you think that the Mexican model could be – to what extent the Mexican model could be regarded as a model for other members of the APEC?

MR MATTHEWS:  Other members of APEC?  Well, I would say this, that we have a very broad agenda of issues in APEC, and I would say it’s probably fair to say that almost every economy participating in APEC has at some point introduced innovative ideas or good policy suggestions that get discussed by APEC and ultimately adopted by APEC.  And Mexico, of course, is one of them.  But it’s part and parcel of the way in which we operate, so particularly in every host year whenever an economy decides to host, they have a chairmanship role which allows them to help highlight issues that they think are of critical importance, and they naturally do this in consultation with other economies.  But it does give them a chance to provide some additional input. 

But even in non-host years every economy has the ability to introduce at working levels at the senior official level new ideas that they think will help all the economies at APEC to grow more effectively.  And Mexico has participated in that and they are an active and helpful player in helping us move towards a more liberal and open system.  So I can only say thank you to Mexico.

MR ZIMMER:  All the way in the back, please.

QUESTION:  Hi, I’m Marion with NHK Japan Broadcasting Corporation.  I have two questions about two major economic developments in the region this year, first of all the TPP and then also economic uncertainty coming out of China and the resulting financial market volatility.  And I’m wondering if those two things would specifically be on the agenda for the leaders’ summit.  TPP, I assume, would definitely be a focus in the trade minister summit, but I’m wondering if there would be a sort of separate TPP meeting at the leaders’ level as well. 

QUESTION:  Well, there’s been no decision, I think at this point, on whether or not there will be a TPP sidebar meeting at the ministerial or at the leaders’ meeting, but I refer to USTR on that.  As we get closer to the date they may have something more for you on that. 

In terms of China, China is pursuing a broad-based economic reform agenda.  It’s a challenging process of shifting the growth model – one dependent on investment and exports to domestic demand – and it’s a natural process you would anticipate that when you go through a major economic policy transition like this that issues will arise.  They seem committed to the process.  I think though the IMF and other economies understand their commitment and are supportive of their commitment to that reform process. 

MR ZIMMER:  Do we have more in the back?  (Inaudible.)

QUESTION:  Thank you very much.  My name is Tatsuya Mizumoto from Jiji Press.  About digital economy: so, are you discussing about cyber security?  And then about TPP, I know you have no TPP agreements, so what kind of the impact you will have to (inaudible) by this?

MR MATTHEWS:  Okay, cyber security does get raised in certain fora within APEC, and – but it’s – we have a pretty strong economic focus for the discussions.  So what you want to do is make sure that you have systems in place that preserve trade secrets, that preserve the integrity of business information, et cetera.  You want to make sure that economies are protected against potential economic downside of cyber hacking, et cetera. 

But I’ll get back to you with more detail that would probably help you, because I don’t have the specifics in front of me but I’d be happy to give you more information on that in a follow-up.

And then your second question was?  I’m sorry.

QUESTION:  (Off-mike.)

MR MATTHEWS:  Yeah.  So APEC’s agenda is separate – TPP is a separate negotiating group of economies.  They’re all APEC members, but it’s done separately.  So we’re not driving the APEC agenda based on what happens in the TPP negotiations.  The APEC agenda keeps moving forward on trade liberalization processes regardless.  So – but obviously, we all welcome the successful conclusion of the TPP, but it won’t directly affect the APEC discussion process.

MR ZIMMER:  Do you have a short follow-up?

QUESTION:  Yes, I want to follow that, so on the TPP.  But I think as – to your final (inaudible) that you are going to write a TPP standard to – in the APEC area, right?  So —

MR MATTHEWS:  Right.  So there are two things.  There’s a free trade agreement of the Pacific discussion group, which basically is starting to flesh out what chapters in an APEC-wide agreement might look like.  That discussion process will go forward, and is going forward, and chapters are being worked on by individual economies who have raised their hands and volunteered to help contribute.  And I guess that’s what I can tell you.  That’s an ongoing discussion process and ongoing drafting process.  That continues. 

MR ZIMMER:  Any final questions?  Okay.

QUESTION:  I am Grigory Dubovitskiy, Russian news agency RIA Novosti.  Are you aware of any plans, maybe possible, to discuss any questions with Russian delegation on the sidelines while SOM meet, maybe you aware of what level it could be?

MR MATTHEWS:  I don’t know about – and I can say to you that I meet with the Russian delegation for the senior officials level on a regular basis and at every SOM basically – and my predecessors did.  So those discussions continue because we have points of discussion that need close communication on a regular basis.  And my team that does APEC issues is, of course, working with our counterparts in the Russian delegation to APEC.  As for more senior-level meeting schedules, I don’t have the specifics for you on that.

MR ZIMMER:  One here, and then a final couple in the back.

QUESTION:  Two quick follow-up questions.  Alexander Panetta, again, from the Canadian Press.  Can you give an example or two of some of the environmental goods and services you’re talking about, and what a change in tariffs might mean or an elimination of tariffs might mean in terms of their proliferation?  That’s the first follow-up.

And the second thing I wanted to ask was, if I understand correctly, that you don’t know yet whether there might be a meeting with the new Prime Minister Trudeau of Canada?

MR MATTHEWS:  Well, I’d refer you to the White House on their scheduling of bilateral meetings for the President during the period of the leaders’ meeting. 

As for your other question on environmental goods and services, well some obvious ones that come to mind that are covered are wind turbines and solar panels – things that you’d say just – inherently you’d say anybody who wants to operate more greenly and wants to generate green power will want to make sure we can get those products to every market in APEC with the lowest tariff possible, if not zero tariff, so that a greater number of firms and a greater number of households can actually adopt the use of those technologies to reduce their energy intake and their carbon footprint.

MR ZIMMER:  Okay.  Maybe one more after this one.

QUESTION:  All right, thank you.  Rob Gentry with TV Asahi.  I had a follow-up on your question about – on your point about reducing tariffs for health care products.  Is it tariffs or is it also non-tariff barriers that you’re interested in on that? 

And then as a general question for the leaders’ meeting, what does the U.S. hope to have in terms of discussion on currency in the region, in terms of its effect on trade?  Thanks.

MR MATTHEWS:  So for healthcare products let me just be clear, we’re in very early stages of discussions on health care products.  Really what we’re doing at this current stage in APEC is agreeing to kind of identify barriers.  But one other thing that I’d like mention to you that we’re doing with regard to healthcare products in APEC is having private sector and governmental cooperation on helping to identify substandard health care products that can enter the market or even fraudulent ones, and then making sure each economy has effective means of taking those substandard products out of the pharmaceutical system to make sure we’re not delivering products which don’t help improve the health outcomes for our citizens.  But so we’re really at an early stage on that healthcare initiative, and we’re not to the point of, I think, identifying tariffs or talking about tariff reductions but just basically doing a study of the overall picture on barriers.

And I’m sorry, what was your other question?

QUESTION:  Currency.

MR MATTHEWS:  Currency.  I can’t give you anything on that.  I don’t know that there’s – yeah, I just don’t have an answer for you on that one.

MR ZIMMER:  Do we have a final question?  Over here, one more.  Last question, please.

QUESTION:  Sorry, it’s still a follow-up to the TPP.  I just wondered, is that like the similar, that during the APEC the discussion group will have a meeting and any country who would like to join the TPP, that they will have the chance to talking about that?  It’s something like that?  Thank you.

MR MATTHEWS:  Yeah, well, thanks for that question.  I don’t believe it’s envisioned right now.  Remember, every economy that’s in the Trans-Pacific Partnership at present is focused on one thing.  It’s getting from the conclusion of the negotiation to ratification within their own system, and that’s precisely where the United States is.  So our focus is completely dedicated to preparing everything we need to do to get ratification by the U.S. Congress.  And until we get that done, we’re not really going to be focusing on other economies.

We welcome the interest of other economies in APEC who are interested in TPP, but we just have to tell folks, please understand our focus right now is getting to ratification.

MR ZIMMER:  Okay, we appreciate Mr. Matthews joining us this morning out of his busy schedule.  We appreciate your joining us.  We’ll see you next time.  Thank you.

# # #

MEDIA NOTE: Global Counterterrorism Forum Co-Chairs’ Fact Sheet: About the GCTF

 

 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Office of the Spokesperson

For Immediate Release

 MEDIA NOTE

September 27, 2015

Global Counterterrorism Forum Co-Chairs’ Fact Sheet: 

About the GCTF

Below is the text of the Fact Sheet issued by the Co-Chairs (Turkey and the United States) of the Global Counterterrorism Forum on September 27, 2015.

Begin text:

The GCTF is an informal, multilateral counterterrorism (CT) platform focusing on identifying critical civilian CT needs, mobilizing the necessary expertise and resources to address such needs, and enhancing global cooperation. Launched at a ministerial meeting in New York on 22 September 2011, the Forum, with its 30 members (29 countries and the European Union), regularly convenes key CT policymakers and practitioners from nations around the world, as well as experts from the United Nations and other multilateral bodies. It has strengthened the international architecture for addressing 21st century terrorism and is promoting a strategic, long-term approach to dealing with the threat. The Forum identifies urgent needs, devises solutions, and mobilizes resources for addressing key CT challenges facing civilian institutions. With its primary focus on countering violent extremism (CVE) and strengthening criminal justice and other rule of law institutions that deal with terrorism, the GCTF aims to diminish terrorist recruitment and increase countries’ capabilities for dealing with terrorist threats within their borders and regions.

 

MEMBERS AND PARTNERS

The 30 members of the GCTF are: Algeria, Australia, Canada, China, Colombia, Denmark, Egypt, the European Union (EU), France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Morocco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States. Additionally, some 40 non-member states and dozens of non-member international, regional, sub-regional, and non-governmental organizations have participated in GCTF activities.

The United Nations is a close partner of the GCTF and a regular participant in its activities. The GCTF takes as a central part of its mission the implementation of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy. More broadly, the GCTF’s work complements and reinforces existing multilateral CT efforts, including those of the UN and relevant regional organizations.     

 

STRUCTURE 

The GCTF consists of a strategic-level Coordinating Committee, co-chaired by Turkey and the United States; six thematic and regional expert-driven working groups; and a small administrative unit. The working groups are: (1) Criminal Justice Sector and the Rule of Law, co-chaired by Egypt and the United States; (2) Countering Violent Extremism (CVE), co-chaired by the UAE and the UK; (3) Detention and Reintegration, co-chaired by Australia and Indonesia; (4) Foreign Terrorist Fighters (FTF), co-chaired by Morocco and the Netherlands; (5) Sahel Region Capacity-Building, co-chaired by Algeria and Canada; and (6) Horn of Africa Region Capacity-Building, co-chaired by the EU and Turkey. As determined during the May 2015 Coordinating Committee meeting, the United States will transition its co-chairmanship of the Forum to the Netherlands following the September 2015 Ministerial meeting. Turkey will transition its co-chairmanship of the Forum to Morocco following the ninth meeting of the Coordinating Committee in spring 2016.

 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • The mobilization of more than $300 million to support national and regional efforts to strengthen civilian institutions and counter violent extremism, including support for the implementation of the GCTF framework documents at both the regional and country levels.
  • The December 2012 launch of Hedayah in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Hedayah is the first-ever international center of excellence for training, dialogue, research, and collaboration on CVE.
  • The June 2014 launch of the International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ) in Valletta, Malta. The IIJ is dedicated to providing criminal justice officials from across North, West, and East Africa and the Middle East with human rights-compliant training to address terrorism and related security challenges within a rule of law framework.
  • The September 2014 establishment of the Global Fund on Community Engagement and Resilience (GCERF) in Geneva, Switzerland. GCERF is the first-ever public-private global fund to support local, grass-roots efforts to counter violent extremism. GCERF is now fully operational in Geneva as a foundation under Swiss law.
  • The adoption of framework documents designed to serve as practical guides for rule of law-based CT and CVE capacity-building activities and implementing CT good practices at the national, sub-regional, and regional levels.[1] These framework documents address a variety of salient CT and CVE topics including:

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Effective, human rights-compliant CT practice in the criminal justice sector;

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Preventing and denying the benefits of kidnapping for ransom by terrorists;

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Multi-sectoral approaches to CVE;

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Community engagement and community-oriented policing as tools for CVE;

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Supporting victims in the immediate aftermath of a terrorist attack;

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Rehabilitation and reintegration of violent extremist offenders;

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Effective responses to the FTF phenomenon;

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]The role of the judiciary in adjudicating terrorism offenses; and

[if !supportLists]·         [endif]Education and CVE.

 

ANNEX 1 – GCTF ACTIVITIES IN 2014-2015[2]

Coordinating Committee

Seventh Coordinating Committee Meeting, Doha, Qatar, 6-7 May 2015

Eighth Coordinating Committee Meeting and Sixth Ministerial Plenary, New York, United States, 26-27 September 2015

 

Countering Violent Extremism Working Group

Workshop on Advancing Women’s Roles in Countering Violent Extremism and Radicalization that Lead to Terrorism, Vienna, Austria, 21-22 October 2014 (jointly hosted with the Organization for Security and Co-Operation in Europe)

Symposium on Strengthening International Cooperation to Prevent and Counter Terrorists’ Use of the Internet, Beijing, China, 17-18 November 2014

Global CVE Communications Exposition, Abu Dhabi, UAE, 9-11 December 2014 (jointly hosted with Hedayah)

Plenary Meeting of the CVE Working Group, London, United Kingdom, 2-3 June 2015

 

Criminal Justice Sector and the Rule of Law Working Group

Plenary Meeting of the CJ-ROL Working Group, Valletta, Malta, 13-14 April 2015

 

Detention and Reintegration Working Group

Workshop on Prison and Security Issues and Implementation of the GCTF Rome Memorandum Good Practices 1-6, Abuja, Nigeria, 12-13 November 2014

Workshop on Capacity Building and Training for the Appropriate Management of Violent Extremist Offenders, Medan, Indonesia, 8-9 April 2015

 

“Foreign Terrorist Fighters” (FTF) Initiative

Expert Workshop on Reintegrating Returning FTFs: Challenges and Lessons Learned, Rome, Italy, 11-12 December 2014

Inaugural Plenary Meeting of the FTF Working Group, Marrakech, Morocco, 15-16 December 2014

Workshop on Raising Community Awareness to the FTF Phenomenon, Washington, D.C., 23-24 February 2015

Conference on FTF, The Hague, the Netherlands, 8 June 2015

 

Sahel Capacity-Building Working Group

Plenary Meeting of the Sahel Working Group, Algiers, Algeria, 24-25 March 2015

Kidnapping for Ransom Experts Meeting, Algiers, Algeria, 26 March 2015

 

Horn of Africa Region Capacity-Building Working Group

Regional Exposition of Counterterrorism Efforts in the HOA Region, Kampala, Uganda, 17-18 March 2015

Plenary Meeting of the Horn of Africa Working Group, Kampala, Uganda, 19-20 March 2015

Workshop on Effective Intra- and Inter-agency Cooperation and Coordination as a Good Practice in Prevention, Investigation, and Prosecution of Terrorism Cases in the HOA Region, Bishoftu/Debrezeit, Ethiopia, 23-25 March 2015 (jointly hosted with the Intergovernmental Authority on Development’s Security Sector Program)

Horn of Africa (HOA)-focused Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) Workshop, Brussels, Belgium, 11 June 2015

 

Other Meetings

Workshop on Air Traveler Security, Perth, Australia, 7-9 December 2014

Inaugural Conference of the Border Security Initiative (BSI), El Jadida, Morocco, 21-22 July 2015 (jointly hosted with the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre)

BSI Study Tour and Experts Roundtable, Cairns, Australia, 25-26 August 2015 (jointly hosted with the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre)

Meeting of the GCTF Working Group Co-Chairs on Preparing for the Next Wave: GCTF Cross-Working Group Initiatives to Address the Life Cycle of Radicalization to Violence, The Hague, the Netherlands, 3 September 2015

BSI Expert Seminar on Cross-Border Cooperation and Border Surveillance Methods, Vienna, Austria, 10-11 September 2015 (jointly organized with the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre)

 

[1] For more information on GCTF framework documents, please visit the GCTF website at www.theGCTF.org.

[2] This represents those activities implemented and planned in CY 2014.  Please visit www.theGCTF.org for additional information about all GCTF activities since the official launch in September 2011.

APPLY TO BE A TED FELLOW

Apply to Be a TED Fellow

Posted on August 19th, 2015 • Comments (0)

Deadline: 20 September 2015
Open to: media entrepreneurs, human rights activists and photographers from around the world
Venue:15 – 19 February 2016 in Vancouver, Canada

Description

TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design — three broad subject areas that are collectively shaping the world. But a TED conference is broader still, showcasing important ideas from any discipline, and exploring how they all connect. The format is fast-paced: 50+ talks over the course of a week, as well as morning and evening get-togethers. As they take in the program, attendees and speakers from vastly different fields can cross-fertilize and draw inspiration from unlikely places. This is the magic of TED.

Twice a year, a group of interesting and impactful people gathers for the week-long TED experience — which attendees have described as “the ultimate brain spa” and “a journey into the future in the company of those creating it.” It’s a winning formula of brilliant, curious minds and groundbreaking content in an immersive and focused environment.

TEDGlobal, held annually in Europe, is TED’s twin conference, sharing its format and audience – but with a stronger international approach. Of its 700 attendees, it draws a more global audience and speaker line-up (three-quarters from outside of the US).

Eligibility

Media entrepreneurs, human rights activists and photographers can apply for a TED fellowship to attend a conference in Vancouver, Canada. The program targets candidates ages 21 to 40 from the Asia/Pacific region, Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Middle East, but anyone over 18 is eligible. Applicants must be proficient in English.

Costs

TED covers the costs for round-trip economy airfare, ground transportation to and from the conference location, meals and shared accommodation on site.

Application

To apply, please fill out the online application form. In addition to basic details and contact information, you’ll need to answer essay questions and provide three references.

Before beginning your application, please review the Application tips, Program FAQ and Terms and Conditions.

Deadline for applying is 20 September 2015.

For more information please visit the official website.

Apply to Be a TED Fellow

Read more: http://www.mladiinfo.eu/2015/08/19/apply-to-be-a-ted-fellow/#ixzz3lTqDkVzG

Programs Assistant (Arabic) Internship posted by: Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) Posted on: August 21, 2015

Internship description

Programs Assistant

Opportunity overview:

Reporting to the Senior Programs Manager, the Programs Assistant is responsible for supporting proposal development and grant writing, as well as some support on project implementation.

The former includes outreach to partners, development of critical paths and assistance in creation of concept notes and proposal documents, as well as support where needed on project administration.

This position is part-time and will run to the end of October. Compensation will be commensurated with experience.

Requirements

Background in project management

Experience writing grant proposals

Arabic (non-negotiable)

French

Primary Duties and Responsibilities

Proposal development and Grant Writing

  • Work with programs staff and the Executive Director on proposal development and grant writing for the Middle East program.
  • Work with the fundraising team to continue grant scanning for other grant opportunities to support scaling the Middle East program.

Support on administration

  • Work with programs staff and the Executive Director to support ongoing administration of programs, with a focus on Jordan, including:

– Monitoring financial reporting from field offices

– Drafting narrative reporting for donors

– Handling stories produced from the field (i.e. categorizing, posting online)

– Drafting departmental documents

– Defining and improving M&E tools

– Threading M&E findings into proposal development

How to apply

Deadline: September 4, 2015

To apply, please submit cover letter outlining relevant experience and resume to information@jhr.ca with the subject line as: Program Assistant – Middle East Program.

Details

Locations

147 Spadina Avenue, Suite 206, Toronto, ON, M5V 2L7, Canada

Other Details

Start date
September 14, 2015
End date
October 31, 2015
Application deadline
September 4, 2015
Hours per week
20
Compensation
Paid
Keywords
Owner’s areas of focus