I’m embarrassed, but I need your help #please… I have a possible tumor and my insurance isn’t helping

I don’t do this often and the few times I have asked for help, I’ve never gotten very far. But I need to try because I don’t know what else to do.

I suppose this is a long rant about what’s going on with me and my life these days. I try to keep it quiet and distract myself with pretty things, but sometimes I need to let it out. And maybe you can find it in your heart to get through this and help me in some way. Anyway.

There are too many things going on. Too many things.  No one I know has money they can lend or just gift me. I have no money. My family of 3 lives off of $17k a year. I honestly don’t know how we make it.

Health insurance is denying my claims. I can’t pay my medical bills. I need a ct scan bc I have a tumour that may need chemotherapy (according to a resident at John Hopkins) and I can’t afford any of it. It may not need chemo or radiation. It could be nothing. It could be outright removed (even though we’ve removed it twice already) but I’ll never know until it’s too late, if I can’t get this ct scan.

I practically live on my asthma inhaler and I often wonder if I can even afford to “waste” another huff of it. My asthma isn’t bad enough to kill me or anything like that, just bad enough to torture me every day and send me to urgent care with the occasional asthma attack that requires being hooked up to a breathing machine.

I got put on prednisone. The side effects are weight gain, fatigue, foggy thoughts, pain, nausea and just about everything I don’t need right now, or ever.

My phone is dying a little more every day. I can’t make or receive phone calls or texts and data anything doesn’t work. I can only use it when I’m home and connected to wifi. It turns off randomly. Freezes. Even when at home, it can take forever for it to do anything. Battery life is an hour at rest if I’m lucky.

My mom’s car is busted. That was our only source of transportation and now that’s gone. We can’t afford to fix it. The closest bus stop is 5 miles away on the highway with no sidewalks. I can’t walk there bc I have nerve damage so severe that I’m on meds galore and still can’t walk longer than 15 minutes. And sometimes the pain is so bad that I can’t walk at all.

I have nothing in my name other than debt. What are these bill collectors going to take away from me? I don’t have wages to garnish. What do they want? I have nothing to give them. If I could dissect this tumour myself, I would maybe sell it to science or some weirdo on Craigslist. That could make some money, maybe.

Nothing is right or even close to it. Even if after 4 years of unemployment someone does want to hire me or even interview me, how would I get there? How do they call me? Even that doesn’t work out right.

I’m stuck and I need help getting unstuck. I’m so embarrassed to even be asking, but I really don’t know what else to do.

If you can find it in your heart to maybe throw a few bucks my way, I’d be so insanely and forever grateful. Maybe you can pass this along to a friend?

Thank you.

Peace and Pistachios,

Heba

xoxo

 

paypal.me/hebavsreason

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Messing About with the Many #Canva #Resume #Template

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There is nothing casual about civilian casualties

Are you a Daily Mail reader? I won’t lie, I usually read the Daily Mail for a laugh. Some of these stories they come up with… they’re just interesting and chuckle-worthy to say the least. I do, however, know that I should never read an article concerning a serious matter on the Daily Mail website. But alas, I torture myself every time and even worse, I always scroll down to the comments section to read the vile things people feel so confidently typing, but rarely say in person.

Some of the worst things I’ve read include:

Comments about how “Real” refugees shouldn’t have phones- Many refugees are fleeing war. That doesn’t mean they didn’t have possessions. Cell phones are no longer a first world standard. Get over it because I’m willing to bet that the vast majority of refugees don’t have these fancy contracts and money to spend speaking hours on the phone.

Comments about how “real” refugees shouldn’t be allowed to wear makeup- First of all, I saw the video this ignoramus was commenting on and the woman did not have makeup up. She was and is naturally gorgeous. Perfect contours, skin and thick eyebrows. She’s prettier than all of us put together. That comment was pure jealousy. Plus, considering everything these refugees have been through, so what if she gets to put on a tiny bit of makeup. She deserves to feel beautiful and like her normal self after the torment of fleeing her country and home.

Comments about how refugees are only in it for the benefits- You know what benefit they really want. The benefit of life!!! I can’t entertain that nonsense.

Comments about how Syrians should fight for their country- This is the silliest comment of all. Syrians have been fighting for their country for years. They’re not only fighting against ISIS, you know. They’re fighting against the Assad regime and the US and Russia and the whole list of countries that have been striking Syria. What weapons do these innocent civilians have that they can use against a whole world? The numbers don’t add up. The worst part is so many refugees are children. Do we really expect children to fight? Because if we allowed that the Daily Mail commenters would comment about how child soldiers are wrong.

Comments about how refugees desire to continue their education makes them economic migrants and not refugees- You realize that these people have had their entire lives come to a complete halt. They’ve literally been sitting around starving and waiting to die. A whole generation of young Syrians is growing up illiterate and unable to do basic math or know much about anything other than war. These refugees aren’t coming over just so they can take advantage of university education. No, if they could have stayed in Syria and continued their education they would have. But there are no teachers left in schools in Syria because there are no schools left. The schools that are left get used as shelters and makeshift community centers.

Comments about how “we” should bomb “them all”- That is an incitement of terror and makes you complicit in murder. Just putting that out there, you horrible human being. I have no problem with seeing ISIS and Assad terrorist thugs get blasted off this earth, however the legal thing to do would be to capture them and try them in a court of international law, in which they would be found guilty and live a long and tortuous life in maximum security prisons. But there is nothing casual about bombing an entire city, killing innocent civilians and calling them casualties.

Comments about how everyone in Raqaa is an ISIS terrorist and that if they weren’t they would have left- Yes, Raqaa is an ISIS headquarter. Yes, ISIS controls the city, but is everyone there a supporter of ISIS, no? But to openly oppose it would leave you dead or tortured. Why don’t people leave? They don’t have the money. Sure smugglers could get you out, but where would you go? The smugglers will take all your money, risk your life and leave you penniless on a raft in the Mediterranean or in the desert on the way to a desolate refugee camp or in some other destroyed part of Syria.

Comments judging refugees for being separated from their families- Seriously? Is this the Olympic category for most vile comment made? Because if it is, you win. People get separated from their families in all sorts of ways that most people would find inconceivable. But it happens all the time. Talk to anyone whose family has been through a war or some sort of catastrophe: I can guarantee you that a majority of people will tell you they have at least one family member that ended up alone or separated from the rest.

Comments about how refugees have “such nice tents”- This dude commented on how her tent was so nice that she couldn’t possibly be a “real” refugee and that she probably has all this money stashed away. How deep in the dirt is your head exactly? Much of this type of supplies has been provided by aid workers, charity organizations and normal human people with hearts that donated much needed goods, such as tents. Do you want to live on a tent on a street corner when it’s raining and cold? No, especially since winter is nearing. You’re just a horrible person for thinking this

Comments stating the run of the mill stereotypes- The long list of racial slurs, insults, and stereotypes that I won’t humor by listing. You know the type orientalist rubbish that is slanderous, libel, disgusting and horrible filth, but Facebook won’t take it down because they’re too worked up taking pictures down of women’s bodies.

 

My conclusions: Firstly, humans are awful. I don’t know how people can be awful. I doubt most of these hateful commenters could handle  day in the life of a refugee. If you really think “we don’t owe them anything,” then you clearly have no idea how complicit our governments are in making Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and the rest of the world, the situation that they are in today.

Secondly, we haven’t learned from history one bit. These comments– ugh just look at some of the things people said during WWII about refugees. Please and compare those comments to now.

And lastly, I can’t be the only one who sees comparison in 9/11 and the invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq with the Paris Attacks and the subsequent bombing of Raqaa.

Civilians, particularly children are innocent and pay the highest toll in wartime situations. I’m not going to sit here and pretend like I know what the answers to terrorism, racism, discrimination and bigotry are. Offhand I would say education, but we all know the world isn’t that simple.

All I want is for people to think for 30 seconds before they type these horrible comments. I pray your ignorant minds become enlightened with knowledge, wisdom and empathy.

 

Camp Coordination and Management (CCCM) Expert Job posted by: Danish Refugee Council, Ethiopia/Djibouti Posted on: August 21, 2015

Job description

Background

DRC has been providing relief and development services in the Horn of Africa since 1997 and initially focused assisting those who are displaced by conflict, but now works with all those in the region impacted by displacement. DRC has offices across the region, and has been working in Ethiopia in 2009 and Djibouti since earlier in 2015 to address the needs of refugees, IDPs, and migrants in or transiting those countries. DRC has or will have offices in Djibouti-Ville, Ali-Sabieh, and Obock, and implements projects in three refugee camps across Djibouti.

Much of DRC’s work in Djibouti is focused on responding to the refugee influx into that country from Yemen. In order to be able to host the new arrivals, the government has asked UNHCR to establish a new refugee camp in Obock, a region in northern Djibouti. Obock is a hard-to-reach region that has been severely affected by drought since 2008 and has the worst malnutrition rates in the country. The refugee camp site, Markazi, is located on the coast, four kilometers away from Obock town, the capital of the region. Markazi camp currently lacks many of the facilities and services associated with refugee camps.

Job profile

The Camp Coordination and Management (CCCM) Expert in Obock, Djibouti will assist and mentor relevant governmental officials in and around Markazi refugee camp to ensure an appropriate and efficient delivery of services to the Yemeni refugee population in the camp. The CCCM Expert will be directly supervised by the Area Manager in Djibouti and will also work closely with DRC’s staff in Obock and countrywide.

Key responsibilities

Technical Support in CCCM

  • Support governmental officials charged with camp coordination and camp management through advice, mentoring, and consultation on a daily basis.
  • Help responsible officials ensure a multi-sectoral response to assist and protect refugees in communal settings in Djibouti, specifically in the Obock region, specifically using a transparent system of management, ensuring maintenance of camp infrastructure, and mobilizing the participation of the affected populations in CCCM.
  • Ensure the participation of women, persons with special needs (PSN), and other traditional marginalized groups in CCCM.
  • Provide assistance to relevant authorities to make all appropriate efforts to find durable solutions for Yemeni refugees in Djibouti.
  • Promote collaboration between duty-bearers and stakeholders working with refugees and others fleeing Yemen in and around Markazi camp.
  • Encourage the inclusion of key humanitarian partners working in Markazi camp and Djibouti more generally in CCCM planning and implementation, respecting their mandates and program priorities.
  • Work to adapt relevant policies and guidelines and technical standards to context of crisis.
  • Conduct capacity building and develop capacities of governmental authorities responsible for camp coordination and camp management, as well as other stakeholders active in the sector.
  • Support any other relevant CCCM training for NGOs, UN agencies, government officials, and members of displaced and host communities.

Aid Strategic Planning in CCCM

  • Conduct rapid needs and assessments to inform camp management and strategic direction as well as identify risks and vulnerabilities, including those related to gender, age and diversity.
  • In close consultation with relevant officials, develop concrete initiatives and specific strategies to improve camp coordination and camp management, as well as reduce identified risks.
  • Assess CCCM needs and identify problems/gaps and propose/prioritize timely practical actions to respond to particular problems.
  • Support the development of site designs that support the protection of and assistance to men, women, boys and girls.
  • Help to conduct contingency planning based on worst-case and most likely scenarios in terms of population movements.

Monitoring, Reporting, and Development

  • Develop and utilize CCCM monitoring tools and mechanisms to ensure proper camp coordination and management.
  • Undertake quality control and site monitoring to ensure that services provided are according to international best practice standards and to measure progress against implementation plans.
  • Work to ensure adequate reporting and effective information sharing amongst all partners working in Markazi camp, disaggregating data by age and gender
  • Conduct program monitoring as per expected outputs and outcomes.
  • Monitor financial spending and budgets for all DRC support projects in CCCM in Obock.
  • Contribute to donor and management reports on CCCM support projects.

Coordination and Representation

  • Share relevant project information with stakeholders.
  • Participate in general camp coordination meetings as well as CCCM specific coordination fora.
  • Coordinate with ONARS, UNHCR, UNICEF, NGOs, and other key stakeholders on CCCM issues and relevant contingency planning.
  • Ensure internal coordination and harmonization of DRC CCCM-related activities with DRC’s Ethiopia/Djibouti and regional protection programs.

Reporting

The CCCM Expert will report to the Area Manager for Djibouti.

Qualifications

  • University or graduate degree in international relations, development, law, gender, or other relevant field.
  • Minimum of three years’ relevant work experience, with experience in camp coordination and/or camp management a requirement.
  • Proven commitment to accountability and quality assurance.
  • Excellent analytical and writing skills.
  • Experience with capacity building, and in convening and facilitating trainings and workshops.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and demonstrated ability to establish effective and working relations with national staff members and other stakeholders.
  • Experience living and working in cross-cultural, multi-sector, insecure, and/or remote environments.
  • Ability to work well under pressure and in adverse conditions.
  • Substantial project management skills and experience.
  • Fluency in written and oral French.
  • Strong professional written and oral English language skills.
  • Knowledge of Arabic, Somali, Afar, or Amharic languages would be a plus.
  • Proficiency in common computer packages and financial software i.e. Word, Excel, Powerpoint, etc.

Duty Station

Obock, Djibouti with some travel across Djibouti and to Addis Ababa. Note that this is an unaccompanied position.

How to apply

Interested candidates who meet the required qualifications and experience are invited to submit updated CV and cover letter explaining their motivation and why they are suited for the post.

We only accept applications sent via our online-application form on www.drc.dk under Vacancies. Direct link to apply for this position is:

https://delta.hr-manager.net/ApplicationInit.aspx?cid=1036&departmentId=19006&ProjectId=145508&uiculture=eng&MediaId=5

Please forward the application and CV, in English through the online application on www.drc.dk under vacancies no later than 4 September 2015.

If you have questions or are facing problems with the online application process, please contact job@drc.dk

For general information about the Danish Refugee Council, please consult http://www.drc.dk.

Location

Obock, Obock, Djibouti

Details

Start date
October 1, 2015
Application deadline
September 4, 2015
Education requirements
Languages needed
Level of language proficiency
Fluency in written and oral French. Strong professional written and oral English language skills. Knowledge of Arabic, Somali, Afar, or Amharic languages would be a plus.
Employment type
Full time
Professional level
Professional
Salary details
This position is rated as A11 on the DRC salary scale available at http://www.drc.dk.
Benefits
Other employment conditions in accordance with the Danish Refugee Council’s Terms of Employment for Global Expatriates recruited by the Horn of Africa and Yemen Regional Office.
Job function
Owner’s areas of focus

Conflict Analyst Job posted by: International Rescue Committee Posted on: August 18, 2015

Job description

The International Rescue Committee responds to the world’s worst humanitarian crises and helps people to survive and rebuild their lives. Founded in 1933 at the request of Albert Einstein, IRC offers life-saving care and life-changing assistance to refugees forced to flee from war or disaster. At work today in more than 40 countries and in 22 U.S. cities, IRC restores safety, dignity and hope to millions who are uprooted by conflict or disaster. IRC leads the way from harm to home.

CONTEXTUAL BACKGROUND

The Syria crisis is often described as the worst humanitarian catastrophe since the end of the Cold War. Inside Syria, 7.6 million people are internally displaced and 12.2 million are in need of humanitarian assistance, with 4.8 million in hard-to-reach areas. There are 4 million Syrian refugees in neighboring countries. This is no short-term humanitarian episode. The devastating human consequences to huge numbers of people will endure for decades. The destruction of relationships, communities, livelihoods, homes and infrastructure will take years to repair.

IRC is offering a robust humanitarian response to the Syria crisis. With an annual budget in excess of $140 million and a rapidly expanding portfolio, supported by more than 1,250 staff in the region, IRC is undertaking programs in Syria and the neighboring countries of Turkey, Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan in the fields of health, child protection, education, women’s protection and empowerment, NFI and food distribution, cash assistance, water and sanitation, and livelihood programming. Our work in these challenging settings gives rise to some of the most pressing issues facing contemporary humanitarian action, including questions of access, security, funding and coordination.

POSITION SUMMARY

Based in Amman as a member of the Public Affairs team, the Conflict Analyst will provide comprehensive analytical support and advice to IRC in the Syria Response Region (SRR). Reporting to the Director of Public Affairs, the role will examine the impact of political, security and military developments on Syria’s displaced and conflict-affected populations and on programmatic, operational and strategic decision-making by IRC. By producing analysis, briefing notes, policy options and presentations to decision-makers within IRC, this position will enhance the effectiveness of IRC’s programs, advocacy and operations undertaken to assist Syrians affected by the conflict in their country.

SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Monitor and assess prevailing trends in the political, security and socio-economic situation in Syria and surrounding region, identify and evaluate implications for IRC’s programs, operational posture and risk management strategies, and produce actionable policy briefs for IRC leadership.
  • Integrate qualitative and quantitative methodologies to produce comprehensive analyses to guide IRC decision-making.
  • Coordinate with the Regional Director, Syria Response Director, SRR Country Directors and Whole of Syria Health Co-Lead to ensure analysis is guided by programmatic demands and therefore value-added and impactful.
  • Prepare briefing notes and customized presentations to inform and advise IRC decision-makers in navigating the complex environments within which they work.
  • Assist country programs to map and understand shifting operating contexts for the purpose of adapting programs to keep them optimally responsive.
  • Contribute to new initiatives, including expanding regional programs and exploring regional fundraising avenues, devised to enhance IRC’s strategy, position and effectiveness in the region.
  • Identify, consolidate and maintain a network of contacts from other INGOs, INSO, ICRC and Red Cross/Crescent movement, UN agencies (including WoS coordination mechanisms, OCHA’s Information Management unit, Needs, Response and Gaps (NRG) and other coordination infrastructure), think-tanks, analytical networks inside and outside the Middle East, as well as Syrian analysts and community-based organizations.
  • Gather and collate existing “4Ws” data on the broad range of humanitarian actors in Syria, including those listed above.
  • Cross-check, update and expand IRC’s context knowledge base through key informant interviews and participant observation (e.g. in coordination meetings). Track and analyze instances of program contraction, relocation, withdrawal, or expansion, depending on security changes or other external access factors, and identify trends and anticipate triggers of follow-on events.
  • Gather information and perspectives on humanitarian presence, coverage and effectiveness from recently-arrived refugees, representatives of diaspora organizations, and remote interviews with people inside Syria.

SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITIES: None.

PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

IRC and IRC staff must adhere to the values and principles outlined in the IRC Way – Standards for Professional Conduct. These are Integrity, Service, and Accountability. In accordance with these values, the IRC operates and enforces policies on Beneficiary Protection from Exploitation and Abuse, Child Safeguarding, Anti Workplace Harassment, Fiscal Integrity, and Anti-Retaliation.

REQUIREMENTS

  • Graduate degree in Government, Political Science, International Relations, Strategic Studies, or related discipline.
  • At least 5 years of directly relevant professional experience, at least two of which overseas.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively with a diverse range of colleagues in IRC and externally to build trust that sensitive information will be handled with discretion.
  • Superb English-language oral and written reporting skills. Demonstrated ability to write and edit documents on deadline and of highest quality.
  • A demonstrated keen understanding of political complexities in the Middle East.
  • Excellent networking, interpersonal, communication, relationship-building and negotiation skills.
  • Proven ability to persuade and influence colleagues not under supervisory authority.
  • Ability to respond to multiple priorities in a timely manner, delivering high-quality products.
  • Culturally sensitive – able and interested in working with a multi-ethnic team.
  • Strong commitment to the IRC’s mission, purpose and values.
  • Fluency in English is essential; Arabic language preferred.
  • Must be willing and able to travel frequently within the region.

Other Information: Amman is currently not assessed as a high-risk environment and remains generally a safe city as long as IRC security protocols are observed. The post is fully accompanied and housing will be provided according to IRC housing policy. Travel at approximately 30% is anticipated.

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How to apply

Please follow this link to apply: Click Here

Location

Amman, Muḩāfaz̧at `Ammān, Jordan

Details

Start date
August 18, 2015
Application deadline
October 17, 2015
Education requirements
Languages needed
Employment type
Full time
Professional level
Professional
Salary details
Negotiable
Job function
Owner’s areas of focus

Kayan Internship Opportunity Internship: Kayan – Feminist Organization

Internship description

Kayan Internship Opportunity

Kayan interns have the opportunity to contribute to all fields of Kayan’s work based on their skills and interests. They have the opportunity to work side by side with Kayan’s team of activists, while learning about critical issues facing Palestinian women in Israel and directly participating in non-violent social activism through a grassroots NGO that aims to address these very issues. Kayan also offers interns opportunities to attend seminars and workshops in the field, giving interns a unique grassroots learning experience.

Responsibilities of the intern include research, program and resource development, reporting, public outreach and social networking, correspondence with potential partners and supporters, events planning, editing of English-language outreach materials, updating Kayan’s website, and administrative tasks. Interns also have the opportunity to create their own project at Kayan that can be pursued in addition to their other tasks.

We ask that interns from abroad remain with us from 5 months to a year. Successful applicants must be fluent in English; additional fluency in Arabic and/or Hebrew is an advantage but not required. Candidates with education in a related field or relevant professional experience are strongly encouraged to apply. Interns should be able to work independently, have strong motivation and learning potential.

To apply for an internship or to volunteer, please send a cover letter and CV to:

Khulud Khamis, Development and Public Outreach Coordinator –

khulud@kayan.org.il

How to apply

To apply for an internship or to volunteer, please send a cover letter and CV to:

Khulud Khamis, Development and Public Outreach Coordinator –

khulud@kayan.org.il

Details

Locations

118 Arlozorov Street, Haifa, Haifa District, 33727, Israel

Other Details

Compensation
Unpaid
Keywords
Owner’s areas of focus